August 21, 2012, 12:16 pm

The church stretches across a falling terrain, with the main functions arranged over three levels. The careful use of petersen brick, copper and wood cladding enhances and separates the volumes while blending them into the nature.

Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter
©Laila Meyrick/Velour
Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter
©Nils Petter Dale
Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter
©Laila Meyrick/Velour
Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter
©Laila Meyrick/Velour
Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter
©Laila Meyrick/Velour
Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter
©Nils Petter Dale
Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter
©Nils Petter Dale
Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter
©Nils Petter Dale
Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter
©Laila Meyrick/Velour
Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter
©Nils Petter Dale
Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter
©Laila Meyrick/Velour
Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter
Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter
©Laila Meyrick/Velour
Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter
©Laila Meyrick/Velour
Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter
©Laila Meyrick/Velour
Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter
Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter
Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter
Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter
Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter
Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter
Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter in Oslo, Norway.
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‘The new Bøler church is the result of an open architectural competition in 2004. The church stretches across a falling terrain, with the main functions either elevated on a plateau (church hall), on ground level (congregation hall) or dug into the ground (chapel).
A sheltering side wing of brick protects the functions from the traffic and the raised rail tracks to the east. The church patio is reached through a gateway, and opens up to the surrounding nature.
The main church hall is entered through an anteroom, and the ceiling lifts towards the far wall. The glazed areas of the sidewalls give glimpses of the nature outside and the shifting seasons.
The main spaces are oriented vertically and connected by a processional axis. Administrative and support functions are located in the side wings. There is a parish kindergarten and a youth club in the lower level.
The main roof structure is steel, supported by concrete columns and concealed by a timber ceiling inside, and copper cladding on the outside. The side wings are load bearing brick carrying in situ concrete slabs. The flat roofs have a green sedum covering.’

Text by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter
ARCHITECT: Hansen/Bjørndal Arkitekter AS, Oslo, Norway. CLIENT: Kirkelig fellesråd Oslo. LOCATION: General Rugesvei 51, Oslo, Norway. DESCRIPTION: Religious. STATUS: completed. AREA: 3231 sqm. ARCHITECT’S TEAM: Jostein Bjørndal, Ellen Soma, Helge Hansen, Erik Andreassen (Partners, all Architects MNAL), Alf Anders Langhelle, Liv Schulze, (Employees, all Architects MNAL). Anders Eidstuen (model – Student of arch). FURNITURE DESIGN (LITURGICAL): Hole design by Lars Ernst Hole, in collaboration with Hansen/Bjørndal Arkitekter AS. CONCRETE ART/CONCRETE ADVISER: Bruk design by Benedikte Thallaug Wedset (Side Alter, Children’s Chapel and floors). ART:Thomas Hestvold (Glass behind alter), Barbro Raen Thomassen (Text entrance area and church floor). CONSULTANTS: Landscape architect: Trifolia landskapsarkitekter, Construction: Seim & Hultgreen AS, Construction brick: Finn Madsø, Ventilation: Ingenia AS, Electro: ÅF-Consult AS, Fire safety: ÅF-Consult AS, Acoustics: Brekke & Strand akustikk AS. DATE: 2011. No part of this web site may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior permission of Morfae and the copyright owner.
Bøler church
Bøler church by Hansen Bjørndal Arkitekter in Oslo, Norway

The church stretches across a falling terrain, with the main functions arranged over three levels.

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